Tag Archives: Civil Rights

More Bathroom Bills

Folks, please, enough with the Bathroom Bills.

If you’re uncomfortable with the idea of being transgender, please talk it through with people who identify as trans. It’s okay to ask questions, as long as you’re open to their answers. They won’t hurt you, and neither will their ideas.

If you don’t know what transgender means, please ask. Nobody knows everything, and people appreciate a willingness to learn. A general rule: the level of respect in the answer will match the level of respect in the question.

If you doubt that transgender is “real,” please allow someone who is trans to share her/his experience. People are different, sometimes extremely different. My own approach: if I don’t understand another’s experience, then it’s on me to ask, listen and learn. Dismissing another’s experience is unacceptable, as is making assumptions based on my lack of understanding. People can have a wide range of experiences regarding gender identity, all equally valid. You might be surprised to discover that along with your differences, you share some common ground.

If you’re worried about what a transgender person does in a public restroom, please ask. You’ll find they behave remarkably like you — nothing dangerous, nothing even interesting. To turn this into a grand political issue is worse than insulting; it’s an irresponsible drain of resources that are desperately needed elsewhere.

If you’re looking for something to occupy your time, please knit sweaters for the homeless, volunteer at a public library, plant a tree, take an art class. But please don’t waste any more time and money on this offensive and useless crusade.

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Amy’s Novels:

Hollywood High: Achieve The Honorable

Caroline Black, 15 years old, leaves her wealthy prep school for her local high school, which opens her world. At Hollywood High, she finds a large immigrant population speaking over 40 native languages. Although frightened and intimidated as she navigates this new territory, Caroline thrives in the diversity of her new school.

Tightwire

Caroline Black, 10 years later, navigates her first year of training as a therapist. Chapters in her treatment of a talented but troubled young man are interspersed with chapters of her own personal history. This book explores how the individual and community mutually influence each other, and the importance of becoming your own whole person.

Visit Amy’s Author Page to check out reviews, read the first few chapters, purchase a book.                                                                              https://www.amazon.com/Amy-Kaufman-Burk/e/B00R0S66Y4

 

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Filed under Bathroom Bill, Civil Rights, LGBT, Trans Ally, Transgender

For Martin Luther King, Jr.

I remember the first time I heard The Reverend Dr. King speak.

I was sitting on a beautifully carved wooden bench, in my family’s kitchen, which was also our TV room. I was eight years old. My mother gave me a grilled cheese sandwich, my favorite snack. Then she said there was a man giving a speech she wanted me to hear. She sat next to me on the bench, and my dad joined us from his study. The year was 1966, and our TV stood as a separate structure with two tall martian-antennae. The screen was black and white, and as Mom adjusted the antennae, the zig-zags clarified into a picture.

A man stood on a stage, speaking to a crowd. I remember being annoyed that my parents were asking me to listen to an adult talk, with nothing interesting like music or cartoons to back it up. Then I began to listen. I remember becoming quite still, mesmerized. His words rang out, pulsing and rhythmic, an intricate blend of sound and sense, building to one crescendo after another. I could feel The Reverend Dr. King, literally feel his presence, a vibrant physicality. When he finished speaking, my parents took me in their arms. Only then did I realize I had dropped my grilled cheese sandwich to the floor.

Rest In Peace, Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Novels By Amy Kaufman Burk

Hollywood High: Achieve The Honorable

Caroline Black, 15 years old, leaves her college prep academy for the local public high school, which opens her world. Written in reaction to witnessing gay students bullied in high school.

Tightwire

Caroline Black, a rookie psychology intern, goes through one year of training, working with her first patient – a young man who is stormy, seductive, complex and troubled. Written in support of healthy sex and sexuality, in support of same-sex parents, and a voice against the stigma of psychotherapy.

Amy’s Author Page On Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Amy-Kaufman-Burk/e/B00R0S66Y4

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Filed under Civil Rights, Martin Luther King Jr.